Walking the Dock 8/7/2017

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OYSTER OF THE WEEK: GLACIER BAY

These oysters originate in the Northumberland Straight between PEI and Brunswick Canada. The Glaciers are grown in off bottom cages, above the red clay bottom and nestled amongst the abundant eel grass. In about 3 years the oysters will reach the choice size or 3 to 3 ½” in length. They have medium cups and shuck relatively easy with a twist and pop. At our tasting, the slurp started with a medium brine that was more clean than powerful. The eel grass kept the flavor light and lemony with a delicate sweetness to finish. This was more of an umami experience, as all the flavors were subtle and when combined, all your senses were stimulated. Let’s pair the Glaciers with an Award Winning “Ciclismo” Deer Run Winery (Geneseo, NY) a blend of crisp semi-dry Vidal and clean and fruity Diamond grapes that will complement the Glaciers or a “Gangster Frog India Pale Ale” Hopping Frog Brewery (Akron, OH), she starts with a bright and citrus hop character up front then adds a welcome complexity to strike the perfect balance!

 

THIS WEEKS FEATURE: ARCTIC CHAR   

A native of alpine lakes and the Antarctic, char is the only freshwater fish that lives in the extreme north where the water temperatures hover just above freezing. Our fish are farmed in recirculating tanks from a land based farm which ensures limited environmental impact. The farms draw in the frigid cold waters from the straight between Isafjorddur Iceland and North Kulusuk Greenland. The fish put on weight to sustain the cold and a high percentage of that growth is fat. The char’s flesh is moderately firm and a finer flake than salmon. It’s this texture and fat combination that make our char a unique culinary experience. A mild, creamy, and buttery savor that has been many a chef’s secret throughout the years. The filets range from a light pink to a deep red in color and at 14 to 16ozs. each, you will get two portions from each side. I have had these in a maple crusted with scallions’ recipe and the sweetness combined with the creamy texture made the dish amazing. A great idea for your blackboard this week!!

 

BLUE MARLIN:

We have some beautiful loins arriving early and mid to late week from Hawaii. Kajiki, as it’s known along the Kona Coast, has a firm flesh that is pink to burgundy in color. The flavor is mild, fatty sweet and raw, it’s firm enough for Poke, ceviche or lightly seared with a citrus salsa. The end of summer screams tropical Kajiki steak and a crisp lime mojito!!

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